Strawberry Lemonade

strawberry_lemonadeAre there any two things more quintessentially summer than strawberries and lemonade?  Well, ok, there’s watermelon, tomatoes, blueberries, pale ales, ice cream, not to mention anything grilled.  Fine.  There are other just as ‘summery’ things.  But, right now, there are loads of strawberries at the local farms and my fridge is full of lemonade.  And, really, strawberry season is over so quickly that I need to embrace every sweet juicy berry that I can before I’m back to having to buy them from the grocery store shipped from California (or someplace even further away).  So, while I can, I’m going to make lemonade.  Well, strawberry lemonade.  Well, actually, my kids are still sick and I don’t have time to make lemonade from scratch, so store bought will work just as well.  Here you go, friends.  Easy, refreshing and sure tastes like summer.

Strawberry Lemonade
 
Prep time
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Serves: 1
Ingredients
  • 2 medium sized strawberries + 1 to garnish the glass
  • 8 ounces lemonade
  • ice
Instructions
  1. Remove stems from strawberries and place them in glass (or pitcher if making for a crowd!)
  2. Muddle (fancy word for squish around) the strawberries with a pestle (or spoon or whatever is handy)
  3. Fill glass with ice.
  4. Top off with lemonade
  5. Place a ripe strawberry on the glass rim for garnish

 

Strawberry Popsicles

strawberryIt’s one of the first beautiful weeks of summer and it started off great.  On a warm, dry sunny Monday, the kids and I set out to go strawberry picking.  From my teen years, I remember my best friend Heather’s mom going strawberry picking and making jars and jars of beautiful, sweet, sticky strawberry jam.  I would beg, barter and plead my way to as many jars of it as I could manage.  The jar rarely lasted more than a few days for me.  Ever since, I’ve wanted to make my own strawberry picking pilgrimage.  Not necessarily to make the jam, because I’m just not sure I have the time or patience for that task right now.  But just to get out there.  And then have gobs of strawberries to eat or make into strawberry shortcake or whatever.  Surely, it would live up to my childhood daydreams about it anyway.  Well, the strawberry picking itself was pretty good.  Let’s just say all my plans for doing magical things with the strawberries, not so much.  Kiddos got sick the next day and by the time I got back to those beautiful strawberries, well, they weren’t quite as pretty.  As it turns out though, they were still just perfect for a few things.  And this was one of them.

My strawberries were so sweet that sugar would have been overkill.  You can add sugar or honey depending on the sweetness of your strawberries and lemonade.  I always have lemonade in my fridge, but if you don’t, use water with a squeeze of lemon or lime.  For denser popsicles, use closer to 4 cups of strawberries and less lemonade.  This recipe made just enough for my set of six large Tovolo popsicle molds, but I certainly would not frown upon using any leftovers as a rum mixer.  Adapted from Martha Stewart.

Strawberry Popsicles
 
Prep time
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Author:
Serves: 6
Ingredients
  • 2-4 cups fresh strawberries
  • 1-2 cups lemonade
Instructions
  1. Remove stems from strawberries
  2. Add strawberries and lemonade to a blender or food processor.
  3. Blend or pulse until the desired consistency is reached (blend more for smooth popsicles, less for chunk popsicles)
  4. Immediately poor mixture into popsicle molds and place in freezer
  5. Freeze overnight
  6. To remove from mold, run popsicle briefly under warm water and then gently pull/wiggle to remove the mold from popsicle

 

 

Sunday Waffles

strawberries

You’re not getting sick of strawberries yet, right?  Ok, good, me neither.  In fact, while we can still get strawberries at the farm stand, we’ve been using them a little recklessly during the week.  Sneaking an extra bowl of Cheerios in at night, just so we have an excuse to eat a few more.  I have all kinds of strawberry-related recipes swirling in my head, but it’s one of those weeks where they’re just not getting done.  So, I say, let’s keep it simple.  Let’s just eat strawberries with everything we normally eat.  And while I can’t think of many things strawberries don’t go with, surely they were meant to be eaten with waffles.

It occurred to me recently that I’d been wasting a lot of money on store-bought waffles.  If it was a Whole Foods week, we’d have whatever healthy frozen brand they carry.  If I didn’t make it to Whole Foods, we’d end up with Eggos.  Now, let’s be honest.  There’s no comparison in taste between Eggos and the healthy cardboard I buy from Whole Foods.  But, have you looked at the Eggos ingredients lately?  Food coloring?  Come on!  Anyway, it reminded me that we could have the best of both worlds if I just made them at home once a week and froze them.  They reheat in the toaster like a dream and, once you invest in a waffle maker, you can make them with things you already have in the pantry.  I like to cure my Sunday night blues by making them for dinner, but you can eat them anytime you want.

The recipe below is adapted from a Cuisinart recipe that came with my waffle maker.  If you’re looking for an all-in recipe though (butter, anyone? ), check out this recipe instead–you won’t be disappointed.

Sunday Waffles
 
Prep time
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Author:
Serves: 8
Ingredients
  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • 1 tbsp baking powder
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1¾ cup milk
  • 6 tbsp canola oil
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
Instructions
  1. Combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a large mixing bowl.
  2. Combine the milk, oil, eggs and vanilla in a separate bowl.
  3. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients, using a whisk to combine.
  4. Turn on your waffle maker and follow the instructions to make the waffles to your preferred doneness. If freezing the waffles, use one setting lower than you would normal choose.
  5. Serve immediately or place on a cooling rack and bring to room temperature before placing in gallon size freezer bags and freezing.